Nº. 1 of  16

memo

speciesbarocus:

Illustration for Edgar Allan Poe’s story “The Premature Burial” by Harry Clarke (1889-1931), published in 1919.

speciesbarocus:

Illustration for Edgar Allan Poe’s story “The Premature Burial” by Harry Clarke (1889-1931), published in 1919.

zolotoivek:

Mikhail Nesterov - The Kremlin in Winter, 1897

zolotoivek:

Mikhail Nesterov - The Kremlin in Winter, 1897

(via deadsunflower)

olena:

Wright’s Celestial Map of the Universe, 1742akaA synopsis of the universe, or, the visible world epitomiz’d / by Thomas Wright of Durham.
{ this }, pieced together.
Also, if you want the ultra-high-res version that might crash/stall your shit (it’s 10k px tall, lossless jpg), that’s { here. } YW.

olena:

Wright’s Celestial Map of the Universe, 1742
aka
A synopsis of the universe, or, the visible world epitomiz’d / by Thomas Wright of Durham.

{ this }, pieced together.

Also, if you want the ultra-high-res version that might crash/stall your shit (it’s 10k px tall, lossless jpg), that’s { here. } YW.

(via fuckyeahcartography)

tuanrf:

John Singer Sargent - Venetian Doorway - 1902

tuanrf:

John Singer Sargent - Venetian Doorway - 1902

(via deadsunflower)

scientificillustration:

babyy-onboard:


❀ I would love to blow this up and hang it on my wall.. is that weird? ❀



Source: http://bibigreycat.blogspot.co.uk/2007/11/anatomie-la-femme-1937.html

scientificillustration:

babyy-onboard:

❀ I would love to blow this up and hang it on my wall.. is that weird? ❀

jumbledplanet:

From “The Deep Blue Sea,” by Bertha Morris Parker and Kathleen N. Daly, Illustrated by Tibor Gergely. Little Golden Books, Simon and Schuster, 1958.  From the personal collection of Jumbled Planet.

jumbledplanet:

From “The Deep Blue Sea,” by Bertha Morris Parker and Kathleen N. Daly, Illustrated by Tibor Gergely. Little Golden Books, Simon and Schuster, 1958.  From the personal collection of Jumbled Planet.

(via scientificillustration)

cavetocanvas:

Frans Snyders and Peter Paul Rubens, Philopomenes Recognized, 1609-10

From the Museo del Prado:

According to Plutarch, Philopomenes, a strategist and general of the Aequian League that fought against Sparta, visited the city of Megara. Because of his unassuming, humble appearance, the lady of the house confused him with a servant and put him to work. The present scene depicts the moment when the husband realizes the general’s true identity, under whose modest appearance is hidden the grandeur of his personality.

Painted right after Rubens returned from Italy, this work reveals the artist’s profound knowledge of classical culture. Its formal aspects, forceful figures and almost tenebrist treatment of light also bear witness to his southern influence.

The idea carried out by these two artists together in the same work marked the beginning of a fruitful collaboration between Rubens and Snyders. Such collaborations were actually quite frequent among Flemish artists. Rubens made the figures while the large still life in the foreground is by Snyders, who shows the same taste for detain in his depiction of some of the animals he would repeat throughout his career, such as turkeys and swans.

cavetocanvas:

Clarence John Laughlin, The Tree of Immensity, 1973

cavetocanvas:

Clarence John Laughlin, The Tree of Immensity, 1973

staceythinx:

Science is lovely in silk (at least it is in the hands of Karen Kamenetzky).

Kamenetzky on her work:

I dye, paint and stitch cottons and silks to create boldly colored wallhangings inspired by microscopic/cellular imagery - a kind of visual invented biology with textiles. I find this imagery metaphorically rich since all change fundamentally happens on this infinitesimal level.

(via scientificillustration)

Nº. 1 of  16